Relevance or Replication? Publishing for a Purpose.

First of all, sorry for the delay between posts. End-of-term-itis (self-diagnosed), combined with a major whole-school event and a master’s assignment, have pushed any potential ideas for sharing to the back of my mind.

I’d like to share some of the thoughts and reflections I’ve been considering lately while my class have completed several writer’s workshops, individual student/teacher conferences and ultimately, published pieces of writing.

All too often, certainly throughout my late primary and secondary education, the term ‘publishing’ has given too much emphasis to word-processing a finished piece of writing, adding a nice title and a bright yellow, unreadable form of ‘Kahootz’ font. I quizzed my students on what they thought ‘publishing’ was, and was fairly unsurprised to hear similar responses.

However, by taking my questioning a step further, I was able to tune them into my line of thinking a little more. Over the course of several tuning-in parts of our Reading and Writing lessons, I introduced my 3/4s to a variety of texts (online newspapers, YouTube videos, Twitter to name a few), explaining that books were just one example of a text that we can learn and gather information from. After giving them this as the ‘hook’, I was able to encourage them to volunteer what our understanding of other texts might be, their answers looked something like this:

In fact, my apologies, because this Popplett doesn’t do their original answers justice; they were much more detailed! It turned out that after all of the immersion, they did know about different types of text (with a few more than me, to boot). They were nearly as stoked as I was. This brainstorming activity had even more benefits, it encouraged us to to share some rich ideas and discussion about how we could mind map or categorise this information (see my post on graphic organisers). I followed this success with questions about why people publish their work in different ways. Trust me, some of the attention-seeking YouTubers prompted some very interesting responses!

This set the basis for the discussion that we have been having this term – what are the ways in which we are able to publish our ideas? As the title and introduction of the post indicates, I began to feel that students simply typing their work wasn’t enough to consider it ‘published’, and I wanted them to feel this way too. After all, if a student has already conferenced with me, received feedback and refined their writing – isn’t word processing it just replication of that final handwritten product?

Now that my students are grounded in new (and some old) forms of media, they are beginning to have a deeper understanding of how and why people did/do things that way. Now that we have a comprehensive portfolio of conferenced writing, and some resources available, there are so many options open to us for showing our ideas. We ended up using the first mind map to develop a classroom poster, ‘Ways we can Publish’ (photo on the way!). One of my Grade 4 girls hit the nail on the head just the other day:

‘Teddy, I’ve typed up my fictional recount and turned it into a podcast. If I publish it another way, to show someone else, that’s okay isn’t it?’


‘Fireworks! Excellent! Fantastic!’ I beamed, ‘Here is a year’s supply of stickers!’ After all, isn’t this what we want our students to be doing with their learning? Understanding how to use the tools that we have got at our fingertips to do something better, cooler, more awesome. Instead of replicating, we are generating something new each time, constantly adding new angles and ideas. This is what I call publishing for a purpose: turning old ideas into new forms that encourage people to become switched on by our way of presenting and thinking.

Where does this all fit in? To finish, let me refer to data generated from the 2009 PISA survey results showing Math data that has been compared with entrepreneurial capabilities by Yong Zhao:

Look closely and you’ll notice that the Asian countries leading the way in regards to testing aren’t achieving the same creative outcomes in entrepreneurial capabilities as Australia and the United States. I’ll reflect on this in more detail in a future post.

For now though, we have success among creative entrepreneurs in our education system. Let’s encourage our students to continue publishing ideas in these new and exciting ways.

Cheers,

Teddy.

Of course, this idea of presenting our knowledge doesn’t just stop in the literacy hour, it extends into every area of the curriculum. This publishing focus was begun after students were immersed in the inquiry writing process for Term 1, and spent time learning revision and editing techniques in Term 2.

I invite any responses and feedback to this post as I would love to see what you are doing in your Literacy classrooms and offer some feedback of my own.


What is working for you in your literacy classrooms this year?

What have your students have really taken hold of and enjoyed?

Are there any publishing resources that I haven’t mentioned here worth sharing?


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4 Comments on “Relevance or Replication? Publishing for a Purpose.”

  1. Mary says:

    Great post Teddy! I tend to agree that ‘typing up your story’ as publishing is a thing of the past. I think blogging has been a great way for my students to realize that there really is an audience out there interested in sharing in their learning. Students have used smilebox or animoto to make photo and text presentations and last week, sock puppets app to record interviews. We have also published class books on issuu.com and uploaded them to our blog or used book creator app on iPad. I am just at the beginning of this journey to find better more meaningful ways to publish student work so I know there are a million other ways out there. I look forward to sharing in some more of your great ideas!
    Cheers,
    Mary

    • teddymercer says:

      Thanks for sharing your resource ideas and kind feedback, Mary. What you are doing sounds like great fun! Your approach sounds quite teacher-led initially and I can’t wait to experiment with those apps! I’ll add your ideas to a list of publishing resources and compile some ideas for a future blog post.

      Cheers,

      Teddy.

  2. What you have written really resonates with the whole ‘we need to be doing more than ask kids to merely rearrange words’ which is what the traditional project work does. You have shared some great possibilities thank you.

    • teddymercer says:

      Wow, thank you Anne for your comments. I’m glad you see it that way too. I’m past asking kids to simply ‘put things in their own words’ too, I want them to engage with the content and think about their audience when they present their new knowledge.

      Keep up the good work on your blog, it looks great!

      Teddy.


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